The role of the microbiota in preventing allergies

Neuherberg & Paris, July 2015: The human body is inhabited by billions of symbiotic bacteria, carrying a diversity that is unique to each individual. The microbiota is involved in many mechanisms, including digestion, vitamin synthesis and host defense. It is well established that a loss of bacterial symbionts promotes the development of allergies. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), and the Institut Pasteur in Paris have succeeded in explaining this phenomenon, and demonstrate how the microbiota acts on the balance of the immune system: the presence of microbes specifically blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies. These results are published in the journal Science.

The intestinal microbiota is significantly influencing the immune system of the host. Source: Dr. Caspar Ohnmacht, ZAUM

Ohnmacht, C. et al. (2015). The microbiota regulates type 2 immunity through RORgt+ T cells, Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.aac4263

Head

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Carsten B. Schmidt-Weber
Chair for Molecular Allergology (Klinikum rechts der Isar)
Director of the Institute of Allergy research (IAF; Helmholtz Zentrum München)

Contact

Zentrum Allergie und Umwelt (ZAUM) 
Technische Universität und Helmholtz Zentrum München

Biedersteiner Str. 29
80802 München
Germany

Phone: +49 89 4140-3451
Fax +49 89 4140-3452
E-Mail: zaumnoSp@m@tum.de

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